The Five-Day Accu-Weather Solar System Forecast

The Five-Day Accu-Weather Solar System Forecast

The five-day accu-weather forecast calls for sunny and seasonably hot weather – on the surface of the sun. Temps are forecast to be somewhat cooler as you head further away from the sun. Going to Neptune? Bring a winter coat.

The five-day accu-weather forecast calls for sunny and seasonably hot weather – on the surface of the sun. Temps are forecast to be somewhat cooler as you head further away from the sun. Going to Neptune? Bring a winter coat.

And now for the latest five-day Accu-Weather Solar System Forecast, we turn to our Cosmological Prognosticator, Venus-Ann Mars. Venus, I hope you have another sunny forecast in store for us.

Thanks, Brad. A lot happening in this portion of the Milky Way galaxy for a Thursday. So let’s get started.

Today’s weather on Mercury – I use the word “weather” loosely, since technically Mercury has no atmosphere – calls for intense radiation and scattered plasma tornadoes. Lows will be – 275 F with an expected high topping out around + 840 degrees. That may be a bit toasty for fans of planet Earth, but for Mercury, that’s actually quite seasonal for wintertime.

Mercury’s two sunset times today are expected to be somewhat later than yesterday, but at this time of year, expect the retrograde motion of the Sun between them to remain the same. And sunset on Mercury is incredible, with the sun appearing two and a half times larger in the sky than seen on Earth. But if you want to catch both sunsets, be patient, as the Mercurian day lasts 58.6 earth days.

As is typical for this portion of its orbital journey, Venus maintains its consistent and perpetual cloud cover with a somewhat uncomfortable high of 870 degrees F and a low of, well, 870 F. And for the next 24 hours, if you’re anywhere near Venus’ equator, I suggest staying indoors unless you absolutely have to go out. That’s because there’s a storm watch for this evening calling for scattered showers of sulfuric acid. Atmospheric pressure stands at 1,350 psi – so, be sure your Venetian vacation venue is adequately pressurized, to avoid being pulverized within seconds from the bone-splitting pressure.

Another reason you might not want to venture outdoors this week on the Venetian surface is due to another expected spike in greenhouse emissions caused by larger than normal levels of CO2 trapped in the planet’s thick atmosphere. And thanks to global temperatures consistently in excess of 800 degrees F, it looks like any remaining liquid on the oceans will be completely boiled off again – for the 4 billionth year in a row. So, if you were looking for oceanfront property on the “Morning Star” planet, my advice is to hold off for another millennium or two.

Turning our telescope to Mars, I’m calling for equatorial highs to reach an unseasonably comfortable 80 F tomorrow. But before you start packing your bathing suit, I should warn you, the lows on the red planet will drop to – 200 F degrees. So, also pack a few layers of yak skin fur coats, just to be safe. And, if you suffer from asthma, you might want to stay indoors because there is a planetary dust storm watch in effect as well.

Looking at the big guy in our solar system, Jupiter once again is experiencing back-to-back hurricanes. A level 9.9 lightning alert has been issued by NASA. Be sure to avoid lower elevations, by which I mean anything near the core of this gaseous giant, as temps are expected to reach 43,000 F degrees. Intense radio emissions will continue at northern latitudes. In fact, radiation in general this time of year is 1,800 times that of the Earth, so, before you head out on a day trip exploring the Jovian planet, you might want to pack some extra Jupiter Screen. I recommend a protection level of 500 or greater.

A special advisory has been issued for Jupiter’s moon Europa. It appears that water geysers have been detected in its southern hemisphere. Divers are advised to remain 500 miles away from these zones, as the tumultuous currents could result in being ejected into deep space. That would be a horrible way to end your European vacation, eh, Brad?

If your travel plans call for a trip to the Ringed Planet, a reminder to avoid attempting to go for a stroll while visiting Saturn. If you tried to walk on its gaseous surface, you’d literally begin a long, perilous descent into the planet, experiencing unpleasantly lethal high temperatures and body-compacting pressures until you were crushed to the size of a walnut as you approached the planet’s core.

If you have a hankering to explore the outer boundaries of our solar system, Uranus or Neptune, be sure to take along a few books because travel time to Uranus, given current space travel technology, is estimated at three years. And during your stop-over on Neptune, eliminate its Great Dark Spot from your tour itinerary. That’s because the Great Dark Spot, which is the size of Earth, is expecting wind gusts topping out at over 700 mph by Thursday. That would be a new wind speed record for planets in our solar system. Good luck holding onto your hat – or surviving.

Here’s a quick look at our forecast for Venus. Same old, same old. Hot and very humid with a chance of late afternoon lava showers.

Here’s a quick look at our forecast for Venus. Same old, same old. Hot and very humid with a chance of late afternoon lava showers.

And if you’re one of those people who still believes Pluto is a planet, I’m pleased to report that spring should arrive on the dwarf planet in just under 60 years, which should give you plenty of time to work out your travel arrangements and update your will.

For you adventure seekers, just a friendly reminder that the methane lakes on Saturn’s moon Titan offer a unique choice for boaters, if you don’t mind the devastatingly toxic fumes. Don’t forget to pack your chemical safety goggles, face shield and CM-7M Military Grade gas mask, before you leave shore.

Just a few other weather reminders. The view of the Sun on Neptune’s moon Triton is expected to be obscured in southern latitudes by the dust and gas geyser. And if you’re planning a pleasure trip to the Mars’ polar ice caps, remember that radiation suits are now mandatory when you’re not confined to a NASA-approved hermetically sealed facility.

Finally, don’t forget about tomorrow’s lunar eclipse on Jupiter’s moon Ganymede. Should be quite the sight to see – if you happen to be anywhere near the surface of Jupiter. Unfortunately for me, I’ll still be stuck in Seattle traffic, so I’m afraid I’ll miss it.

That’s it for the weather. Now back to planet earth and Lenny Johnson for sports. Hey, Lenny, are my Seattle Mariners going to have a decent bullpen this year?

That’s the view from the bleachers. Perhaps I’m off base.

This week’s post was conceived by and co-written with my good friend William Maxwell, a serious astronomy buff who does astronomical photography and writes about celestial phenomena for various publications. You can check out William’s astro images at www.astrobin.com/users/WilliamM.

 

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© Tim Jones, View from the Bleachers 2021.

Donald Trump’s Latest Five-Day Weather Forecast

Donald Trump’s Latest Five-Day Weather Forecast

“If you look closely at this undoctored map, you’ll see Florida looks a little like a penis. Nobody ever knew that before, believe me.” – Donald Trump

“If you look closely at this undoctored map, you’ll see Florida looks a little like a penis. Nobody ever knew that before, believe me.” – Donald Trump

Welcome back to Fox News. In a moment, we’ll get to our top story – why 97% of Americans think Donald Trump is a better president than Abraham Lincoln, according to a recent Fox poll of white nationalists.

But first, let’s take a look at the weather with our Meteorologist-in-Chief, President Trump. So, Donald, tell me, are we in for some STORMY weather this week?

You think that’s funny, do you, Shep Smith? You’re fired. Now get that bum outta here.

Good evening, my fellow Americans. This is your President with a look at your five-day forecast. For the 137th week since I’ve been your president, the American weather continues to be great – the best weather in our nation’s history – and way better than the weather under eight years of Obama.

Looking at the national weather map, I promise you, we’re in for some tremendous weather throughout many regions of the country. At Bedminster, New Jersey, home of Trump National Golf Club, the weather will be 76 degrees, breezy and sunny all week. Closer to home, here in Washington, DC, locale of the Trump International Hotel, you won’t believe how incredible the weather is going to be. Just phenomenal. And at Mar-A-Lago, I’m calling for another week of mild temperatures in the upper 70’s with no chance of rain or humidity right up to election day in November 2020.

But we do have a few trouble spots to keep an eye on, namely in California, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Baltimore, where it will be Hell on earth. Expect temperatures to reach 115 degrees for daytime highs and plunge to minus 15 overnight. Look for massive tornado warnings in any state that did not vote for me – with the likelihood of hot balls of lava erupting near Seattle and vicious tsunami’s all along the Mexican border.

Now that Hurricane Dorian is over, I’m pleased to report that the devastation I had predicted for Alabama happened just exactly as I had said it would – just a few hundred miles east in Georgia and the Carolinas. I hope every American will join me in saying a silent prayer for the great people of Alabama – especially those who voted for me – in hopes that they will overcome their anxiety in the wake of this devastating storm.

Speaking of hurricanes, everybody’s talking about Hurricane Dorian and why it chose to strike America when it did. Most experts are saying that Hillary Clinton was behind it, in an attempt to damage my amazing golf courses in Florida and along the east coast. But she failed bigly – just like she did in 2016. Sorry, Bahamas.

Most people never knew that hurricanes are named in alphabetical order starting with the letter A. I was promised that after Hurricane Chantal struck, the next one would be named Hurricane Donald. But at the last minute, the Fake National Weather Service changed it behind my back to Dorian. So, I’m ordering the FBI to investigate how this could have happened. Probably the deep state.

Looking further out, the forecast for hurricanes is hard to predict. But one thing’s for sure. If I’m not re-elected in 2020, everybody should expect the nastiest hurricanes in history. Several level 5 storms, a few level 6s and maybe even a couple of level 9s or 10s. I predict some of them will be the wettest weather events in history, from the standpoint of water.

“Here’s a look at the five-day forecast for Boston. They should’ve voted for me; They would have had the best weather. Those Bostonians are nasty people.”

“Here’s a look at the five-day forecast for Boston. They should’ve voted for me; They would have had the best weather. Those Bostonians are nasty people.”

Taking a check at the national forecast, I predict the next major hurricane, which I have ordered the National Weather Service to name Hurricane Melania, will pack winds up to 390 miles an hour, and will most likely make landfall in Los Angeles and head up the coast of California, wiping out San Francisco and Portland, before jumping over the middle part of our nation and touching back down again near Chicago and Detroit, taking them out entirely. But it will leave farmers’ crops just fine. No need to thank me.

You can see my projected path of this storm in this incredibly accurate sharpie drawing of the Zone of Uncertainty, which I had nothing to do with drawing. It was that way when they gave me the map. Trust me.

Oh, and the pollen count will be slightly above normal in Atlanta over the next few days.

That’s it for weather. Now it’s time for Tucker Carlson and sports. Hey, Tucker, speaking of sports, while I was closely monitoring the path of Hurricane Dorian during my two rounds of golf last week, I got a hole in one – on a par five, believe me. But as usual, the Fake News didn’t report it. People tell me I’m a tremendous golfer.

So, Tucker, are you still betting on your New York Jets to make it to the NFL playoffs this year? If you ask me, they’re a bunch of losers. Just like Anderson Cooper. And Rosie.

That’s the view from the bleachers. Perhaps I’m off base.

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© Tim Jones, View from the Bleachers 2019

Swingin’ in the Rain

Swingin’ in the Rain

swingin in the rain - tee shotRecently, I played a round of golf with my longtime golfing buddy Kevin. Kevin hates it when I refer to him by his actual name in my posts, so that’s how I will refer to him – because I just like to piss Kevin off. We were scheduled to play a round, but I called him an hour before our tee time to report that it was raining cats and dogs at my house. “Really? Well, it’s sunny and clear here,” he said. So against my better judgment – which judgment is shaky at the best of times – I decided to go ahead and play.

We were met at the course by the rest of our foursome, Ron and John. And just like Kevin had predicted, it was clear and dry – conditions that were going to change dramatically about fifteen minutes after we teed off.

Kevin and I have been playing golf together for 17 years. It has evolved into something of a rivalry. It often comes down to the final hole before Kevin knows for sure whether he beat me by double digits or just single. You see, Kevin is a really good golfer and, with rare exceptions, I allow him to beat me – mostly to placate his fragile male ego, which shatters like broken glass if he loses to me in anything. And also because he is the far superior golfer.

Ron, John, Kevin and I teed off at the first tee. Kevin hit a gorgeous drive 270 yards straight down the middle of the fairway. Then it was my turn. I smiled as my ball landed eerily close to Kevin’s – by which I mean 100 yards closer to the tee box and banana-sliced 40 yards into the right-side woods. Oh yeah. The game was officially on.

As we reached the second hole, I noticed a few gentle droplets of rain. Kevin shook it off. He was sure it would pass. His smart phone’s weather app said it was going to be mostly sunny by afternoon. But at 8:15am, the sky was looking foreboding, like the skies over Mordor. As Kevin headed up the second fairway and I headed due east into the right-side forest, I noticed the raindrops were coming down harder. Wisely, I had decided to bring a jacket. Unwisely, I’d soon discover it repelled water about as effectively as toilet paper. And I forgot my golf cap.

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Rain, clouds, moss and other reasons I love Drip City

Rain, clouds, moss and other reasons I love Drip City

Seattle - Space NeedleI’ve lived in Seattle for over twenty years and I still love it here. It’s known by various nick names: Jet City (because of all the Boeing jets built here) and The Emerald City (because of all the greenery). Personally, I prefer Drip City because it’s more accurate, thanks to all the rain and the fact that at last count there were at least 1,542 Starbucks locations in downtown Seattle alone.

For many people in the eastern two-thirds of the country, Seattle is this mysterious, faraway place they only know about from Sleepless in Seattle. But there is so much more to this city than a spunky Meg Ryan (although let’s not understate Meg’s importance).

Let me debunk a few myths about my adopted city:

  • Myth: It rains here all the time. That is simply not true. The weather here is gloriously sunny and mild with zero humidity – if you happen to be here in August. Otherwise, yeah, it does rain a fair bit.
  • Myth: The sun vanishes for nine months of the year, from October through June. Again, utter hyperbole. There are many winters where you may see the sun for long stretches of time – usually during the second week of August.
  • Myth: It is so damp here that the roofs of most houses are covered in thick moss. Actually, it’s more like a light dusting. And this also goes for the dusting of moss you’ll typically find on our lawns, driveways, patio furniture, and any toddler who has been left out in the backyard for more than 45 minutes.

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